CEO Portrait of Financial Investor Irving Kahn Businessweek Corporate Portrait of Centenarian Financial Advisor Irving Kahn CEO Portraits NYC.jpg
CEO Portrait of Financial Investor Irving Kahn Businessweek Corporate Portrait of Centenarian Financial Advisor Irving Kahn CEO Portraits NYC.jpg

I first met investor and financier Irving Kahn when I photographed him for SmartMoney Magazine in early 2009. At that time, he was the ripe old age of 103, and still going into the office everyday. Businessweek Magazine ran this portrait of Irving Kahn for a story about him in April 2012 (I had totally forgotten they ran this story. It was published in the magazine as well). So that would have made him 106! And he’s still offering his financial advise on how to play the market. Irving Kahn is now 107 years old and apparently still up and at it!

From the Businessweek article:

“No two recoveries are alike. When I came to Wall Street in 1928, I thought the market was crazy. It hit the brakes in ’29. You have to be careful to distinguish between one recovery and the other. You stick to value, to Benjamin Graham, the man who wrote the bible for the market. It’s a mistake to believe you can do more, I warn you. John Maynard Keynes was one of the most famous economists in history. He was a genius, but he failed as a macro investor. It was hard to believe at the time. But when he became a bottom-up value guy, well, he became very successful. With value investing, you don’t have to bend the truth to accommodate periods with derivatives and manias. Value investing will almost always be right.

I’ve seen a lot of recoveries. I saw crash, recovery, World War II. A lot of economic decline and recovery. What’s different about this time is the huge amount of quote-unquote information. So many people watch financial TV—at bars, in the barber shop. This superfluity of information, all this static in the air.

There’s a huge number of people trading for themselves. You couldn’t do this before 1975, when commissions were fixed by law. It’s a hyperactivity that I never saw in the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s. A commission used to cost you a hell of a lot; you couldn’t buy and sell the same thing 16 times a day.”